Why Gut Health is Important for Peak Athletic Performance

Exercise and Gut Health

Your gut health affects how well your body functions, especially when you’re hoping to improve your speed, stamina and recovery as an athlete. Did you know you have an entire microbiome of healthy bacteria in your gut working to keep you healthy? It’s influenced by stress, food and exercise. When you create habits for a healthy lifestyle, your gut health improves, preparing your body for the best athletic performance.

Exercise and Gut Health

Exercise increases metabolism, improves blood flow and produces butyrate, an energy source for your cells. The production of lactic acid temporarily leads to sore muscles, but one type of gut bacteria, Veillonella atypica, loves lactate. In fact, this gut microbe is only found in high-performance athletes. People with metabolic diseases, which make it difficult to achieve results from exercise, have the potential to use sports supplements Lawrenceville GA in the form of probiotics with this strain of bacteria to improve their results.

Gut Health and Hydration

Water is supremely important when exercising as your body loses water through sweating and breathing. A healthy gut microbiome helps transport electrolytes through the body, which increases hydration and keeps water levels even throughout the body. Electrolytes are important minerals, including sodium, chloride and potassium, that keep the body fluids balanced while you work out.

Sleep and Your Performance

The gut regulates the hormones that affect your ability to sleep well. Keeping your gut health diverse will help you fall asleep quickly and stay asleep so you can increase your athleticism. To prevent sleep problems, try sticking to a schedule, eating well and avoiding alcohol before bed.

Whether you’re training for a marathon or joining a local gym, you want to ensure you’re providing your body with the proper gut health it needs to perform at it’s best. Take the time to explore the options available for optimal gut health with your doctor or local nutritionist.